This bulbous style head seems like it might not be such a darn problem to extricate from the tough topsoil around here.

Last time out, one of the bolts was equipped with a bodkin point, much like the original head from the British Museum seen in that posting from yesterday,  and after its 845 yard sojourn downrange, it required some enthusiastic counter-mining  just to get it’s eleven inches of buried length to wiggle around enough so the whole thing could be pulled out of the ground intact.  The design seen here is intended to reduce penetration and make extraction from the ground a less arduous process.  Better start cross- pinning the heads.  It’s no fun if the head detaches at the bottom of the hole.

After all, if we have a dozen bolts sticking out of the ground,  I don’t want to be playing   “groundhog day” with them all afternoon. You’ve got to think of these things when the youthful-vigor of your lumbars takes sabbatical.

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Update:  Nope! don’t like it!  Back to the drawing board.  Maybe something more like one of these originals found on Wikipedia.

The notion that blogs, as a medium, constitute a “public, private space”,   is amply demonstrated by all the ungainly fidgeting around that goes on here.   Our aim in these pages has always been to catch the ricochets as well as the direct hits.  Journal writing requires an extensive commitment to the mundane.

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Update:   …..

… Well, maybe.

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Update:  Almost had it right that last time, but the weight (as calculated by volume from the solid model)  came in at .454 pounds. The target weight I’m after is .375 pounds.  That should yield a  nice, relaxing, 850 yard range for our maximum distance accuracy tests.  And so, we tweak the model a little ….

These babies come in at .376 pounds each.  Good enough for government work.   The square portion of the head has a more acute angle to it than the previous version.

You see, every blessed little detail.  It just goes on and bloody on, doesn’t it?

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And from that classic 1933  movie,  I’m No Angel,  we have this rug pulling wisecrack to consider:

Eddie Arnold —  “Tira, I’ve changed my mind!”

Mae West (in her unique, laconic drawl)  —  “Yeah, does it work any better?”

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